Dr. Daniel W.A. Noble

News flash: Dan Noble has finished his PhD! While Dan still has the official graduation ceremony in his future, we had a small signing ceremony in the lab. Dr. Keogh (Dan’s co-supervisor), brought a special pen from Canberra, the nation’s capital, just for this event. Dan’s thesis (dissertation in North American parlance) looks relatively . . . → Read More: Dr. Daniel W.A. Noble

A pilgrimage to Down House

Recently, Martin Whiting and Lizard Lab alumnus Pau Carazo made a pilgrimage to Down House, Charles Darwin’s family home where he wrote the Origin of Species and many of his other classic works and where he conducted many of his experiments. It was a highly memorable day, here are some photos.

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Hatchling lizards show their smarts in the classroom

Lizard cognition has experienced something of a resurgence in the last few years. To get up to speed, take a look at a previous post summarising most of the recent published work. In a new paper published online in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Ben Clark, Dan Noble and Martin Whiting from the Lizard Lab . . . → Read More: Hatchling lizards show their smarts in the classroom

PhD opportunities in lizard behavioural ecology at Macquarie University

I currently have several openings for PhD students in my research group. My lab has two major research themes: cognition and animal communication/social behaviour. These themes encompass several disciplines and recent projects include sexual selection, mating systems, signalling and cognition in a multitude of lizard species (blue-tongues, water dragons, eastern water skinks, great desert . . . → Read More: PhD opportunities in lizard behavioural ecology at Macquarie University

Dispatches from the field: touring China’s deserts in search of toad-headed agamas

I am currently in Xinjiang Province, northern China, with Dr. Qi Yin, our collaborator from the Chengdu Institute of Biology (CIB), which is part of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). We have funding from CAS to study the evolution of complex visual signals in toad-headed agamas (Phrynocephalus) and this is the second year . . . → Read More: Dispatches from the field: touring China’s deserts in search of toad-headed agamas

Better red than dead? Fiery frills win more contests in the Australian Frillneck Lizard

Dave Hamilton, Martin Whiting and Sarah Pryke

Recently, the Pryke Lab published its first paper on a reptile—the iconic Frillneck Lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii). Both males and females have frills and until now, the consensus has always been that frills play a role in anti-predator behaviour. Not only does the frill startle a would-be predator, . . . → Read More: Better red than dead? Fiery frills win more contests in the Australian Frillneck Lizard

Dispatches from the field: Australian Geographic expedition to the Kimberley, WA

The Kimberley in Western Australia is a vast expanse of wilderness, famous for its pristine gorges and unique fauna. It’s also home to the highest species richness of goannas—up to 10 are sympatric in some areas. Sean Doody (University of Tennessee and Newcastle), Simon Clulow (University of Newcastle) and Colin McHenry (Monash University) have . . . → Read More: Dispatches from the field: Australian Geographic expedition to the Kimberley, WA

Tadpoles need friends too!

A major interest in our lab is social behaviour and why animals live in groups. Group formation has evolved numerous times independently in many different species. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate (evolutionary) factors driving group formation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Stephan Leu recently spent time in the Lizard Lab and . . . → Read More: Tadpoles need friends too!

Lizard Lab launches Instagram account!

For those of you with Instagram accounts, the Lizard Lab has just launched it’s own account: lizardlab

Please follow us! Here’s a sample of our Instagram photos:

. . . → Read More: Lizard Lab launches Instagram account!

Grant Webster wins best honours/masters student presentation at ASH!

The Australian Society of Herpetologists (ASH) just concluded its annual conference at Point Wolstoncroft at Lake Macquarie. The conference was one of the largest ASH meetings ever–maybe the largest (I forget), with 170 delegates. Martin, Dan, Siobhan and Grant attended and gave talks. This was Grant’s first ASH conference and it was a memorable . . . → Read More: Grant Webster wins best honours/masters student presentation at ASH!