Welcome Dr. Feng Xu!

The Lizard Lab welcomes our friend and colleague Dr. Feng Xu, visiting from Xinjiang, China, for a year! Feng is visiting from the Key Laboratory of Biogeography and Bioresource in Arid Land (KLBB), Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). His research has three main areas: 1) conservation biology of . . . → Read More: Welcome Dr. Feng Xu!

Dispatches from the field: the social lizard landscape (Albury, New South Wales)

Part I By Martin Whiting

This post is long-overdue! Here, we are reporting on two field trips to our new study site in Albury, in New South Wales, close to the border with Victoria. In December of last year, Martin, Dan and Geoff While (University of Tasmania) went on a field trip to establish . . . → Read More: Dispatches from the field: the social lizard landscape (Albury, New South Wales)

Athletic lizards: Sex, hormones, and physical performance

By Dan Noble

When it comes to animal athletics lizards have been model systems for exploring the relationships between ecology and physical performance. Our two recent papers, one in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society and the second in Behavioral Ecology add to the growing list of studies looking at functional performance in lizards.

Eastern water . . . → Read More: Athletic lizards: Sex, hormones, and physical performance

Dispatches from the field: South Australia tree skink reconnaissance

By Julia Riley

The Tree Skink (Egernia striolata) field crew has just returned from fieldwork in South Australia. We (Julia, James, Martin and Dan) were checking out two new field sites for potential long-term monitoring of social systems.

Our trip began by flying to Adelaide, and even though it was Good Friday Adelaide . . . → Read More: Dispatches from the field: South Australia tree skink reconnaissance

Sex, boldness and learning in a lizard

Followers of the Lizard Lab blog will have read previous reports about relatively rapid learning in lizards. In those studies we typically focused on males or avoided drawing comparisons between the sexes because either the sample size was limited or the focus of the study was different. In our latest paper we decided the . . . → Read More: Sex, boldness and learning in a lizard

Photos from field work in Xinjiang Province, China

Take a look at photos from our field work in northern China, where we were studying complex communication in toad-headed agamas (Phrynocephalus).

Our photos are loaded on Flickr, where you can view pictures of our study animals and past field trips. Click on the photo below!

. . . → Read More: Photos from field work in Xinjiang Province, China

Dispatches from the field: tough times for desert lizards in parts of Xinjiang Province, China

We have just recently finished working on a particularly interesting lizard: the toad-headed agama Phrynocephalus axillaris. We found a population on the gravel plains just west of Ruoqiang, in central Xinjiang Province, while searching for another species, P. forsythii. On that topic, P. forsythii has proven to be something of an achilles heel for . . . → Read More: Dispatches from the field: tough times for desert lizards in parts of Xinjiang Province, China

Sex in the lizard world: Promiscuous females and protective males

The sex life of Australian water skinks (Eulamprus) has received considerable attention in the past few decades. The Keogh Lab documented alternate reproductive tactics in E. heatwolei and Jess Stapley’s PhD focused in part, on fitness consequences of ARTs. More recently, Dan Noble has been working on ARTs in E. quoyii, and this work . . . → Read More: Sex in the lizard world: Promiscuous females and protective males

The global conservation status of reptiles: one in five species is threatened

With the exception of perhaps crocodiles and turtles, the attention devoted to the conservation of reptiles has for a long time lagged behind that devoted to birds and mammals. A recent study published in Biological Conservation, to which we contributed a small amount of data, has attempted to redress this conservation short-fall. The extinction . . . → Read More: The global conservation status of reptiles: one in five species is threatened

Happy new year from the Lizard Lab!

Admittedly a little late, but this is what happens when you leave your camera at a friend’s house in the city. All the best for 2013 from the Lizard Lab! We hope to keep providing field dispatches and news about our findings and those of the scientific community in general. . . . → Read More: Happy new year from the Lizard Lab!