Dispatches from the field: tough times for desert lizards in parts of Xinjiang Province, China

We have just recently finished working on a particularly interesting lizard: the toad-headed agama Phrynocephalus axillaris. We found a population on the gravel plains just west of Ruoqiang, in central Xinjiang Province, while searching for another species, P. forsythii. On that topic, P. forsythii has proven to be something of an achilles heel for . . . → Read More: Dispatches from the field: tough times for desert lizards in parts of Xinjiang Province, China

New Scientist reports “Cold-blooded burrow sharing in Tibetan lizards”

Gilead Amit has featured our recent PLoS One paper (full reference below) in New Scientist. Read the article by clicking the link below.

Cold-blooded burrow sharing in Tibetan lizards and to download the PLoS One article for free, click on the article diagram below.

Y Qi, D W A Noble, J Fu, M J . . . → Read More: New Scientist reports “Cold-blooded burrow sharing in Tibetan lizards”

What makes an angry Phrynocephalus mystaceus?

A very upset Phrynocephalus mystaceus. Photo © Qi Yin.

Blog posting by Dr. Qi Yin, Chengdu Institute of Biology (CAS)

When you see the colorful and threatening face above, what response does this evoke? Imagine a lizard predator about to grab a lizard and suddenly it flares it’s cheek flaps and . . . → Read More: What makes an angry Phrynocephalus mystaceus?

New lizard enclosures in China!

Our great friend and colleague Dr. Qi Yin of the Chengdu Institute of Biology, who is an associate of the lab, has just finished building an amazing complex of enclosures at Xiaman Conservation Station in the Zoige Wetland Nature Reserve, Sichuan Province. We like to think of this as the Chinese branch of the . . . → Read More: New lizard enclosures in China!

Dispatches from China part 2: lizards, yak poo and high altitude basketball

We are currently in a race against the clock. Unfortunately the weather hasn’t exactly been kind to us. Yesterday was great, we had a nice sunny day and collected tons of data. (We are in China visiting and assisting Dr. Qi Yin on his toad-agama project with an eye to setting up future collaborative . . . → Read More: Dispatches from China part 2: lizards, yak poo and high altitude basketball